Android Q Developer Beta Overview

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Android is getting better each year. No doubt open source is architecture, availability, developer friendly, etc are the key components  for its greater success. Every year Google Pushes its android developer beta program in march for major release and year there is no exception.

Google released first developer beta of Android Q on wednesday. As is usually the case, today’s release is really meant for developers only. Most of the bigger, front-facing changes that will affect users likely aren’t here yet, although Google says that the new update will bring some interesting changes, like better privacy controls and native support for foldable phones.

First developer beta is available for whole pixel lineup including the first-gen Pixel and Pixel XL. Google says it extended support to those models due to popular demand — but we won’t recommend to install it on your main device. Google is saving features for later announcements like Google I/O, the early preview still gives us a valuable look at what Google is updating with Android Q.

Here is a list of all Android A features:

Control over your location data:

Google is also finally, finally improving the sharing option in Android Q, allowing developers to pre-publish how their apps work with sharing, meaning that the share UI can load instantly instead of having to manually rebuild all the possible options every time. Previously it was lagging a lot while sharing. This  It’s a small change should make Android Q far more enjoyable to use. Also their is one more change i.e. blocking the clipboard access to apps that don’t need it. On the previous versions of Android, which most of you use probably, any application could access the clipboard data. While this is a huge win for security, it will affect many 3rd-party developers. I’m sure we’ll agree that letting every single app to access your clipboard, where you copy sensitive data like passwords and credit card information, is not a good idea.

Faster sharing options:

Google is also finally, finally improving the sharing option in Android Q, allowing developers to pre-publish how their apps work with sharing, meaning that the share UI can load instantly instead of having to manually rebuild all the possible options every time. Previously it was lagging a lot while sharing. This  It’s a small change should make Android Q far more enjoyable to use.

Dark mode:

Google is clearly preparing a system-level dark mode for Android Q. But it can be tricky to access, and for now, there’s no simple on or off switch. It can be switch on by using ADB Command but need advance knowledge. If you’re excited then you can check XDA Developers blog to enable it. The easy method to test out dark mode is enabling battery saver mode, which turns a lot of the system’s white backgrounds to black. But battery saver also does other things to prolong your phone’s charge.

The right settings when you need them:

When an app detects that it’s unable to access something it needs like data connection, Bluetooth, wifi etc. it can now automatically bring up a menu that asks you to toggle that specific setting on. Previously apps need to show the steps to enable it. Small but very helpful change!

Remaining battery life:

When you pull down the quick settings menu in Android Q, near battery percentage icon you will see estimate for the amount of time you’ve got left on that charge. This can obviously change quickly depending on how you use your phone and it’s not necessarily a thing you’ll want to rely on, it’s at least a convenient reference.

Google’s Product Sans font:

The default system-wide font on Pixel phones is now Google’s own Product Sans. It was already prominent in Android 9 Pie, but now it’s basically everywhere.

UX customization:

If you’re an advanced user of Android and enabled developer settings, you’ll be able to change the accent colour used across the Android OS. There are four to choose from also you can set the default font. It’s not as impressive as One Plus levels of theming, but it’s good to see Google making progress and maybe it’s just a pinch of salt.

Share WiFi details from QR codes:

The first beta of Q has a clever trick that allows you to share a Wi-Fi network credentials in the form of a QR code. I guess that easy and safe way for users to share their with others without spoiling password details to their friend. They can scan the QR code to Join your Wifi immediately.

Desktop Mode:

Android Q Introduces a Desktop Mode. Which is kind of similar to Samsung’s Desktop Mode? Currently, it’s not available right now but can be enabled now with the use of ADB Commands. To Know More Read XDA Blog. We can add app shortcuts to the desktop which launch in freeform multi-windows, a feature which first launched with Android 7.0 Nougat. You can also set a custom wallpaper for the desktop. The status bar and navigation bar seem unchanged, but you have a lot more room to work with now.

Emergency button in the power menu:

Making emergency services easier and faster to access is always important for end users, so Google has put a new emergency tile right in the main power menu that appears when you press and hold the Pixel’s power button.

Last but not least some changes and mistakes:

Google has chosen to add a visual representation of the Pixel 3 XL’s notch to screenshots and their on way to disable this option. Whether the notch stamp is intentional or a mistake, hopefully Google will at least give users the choice to turn it off otherwise it will be biggest mistake. Another feature is missing in beta i.e. ability to see which apps are using which censors in background. It was present in leaked beta of android Q before which shows icons of sensors in notification bar when apps using them. It will be great feature if Google bring back in future.


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